2019 Teaching Renewal Week

January

14 to 18

2019

Reynolds Alumni Center

Sponsored by Teaching For Learning Center

Register

We regret to inform you that we are postponing the “Public Conversation on Inclusive Excellence,” lunch, and the “Workshop for Operationalizing Inclusive Excellence” which were scheduled for tomorrow, Tuesday, January 15.

Unfortunately, Dr. Brookfield is unable to join us. To preserve the full integrity of the program, we look forward to rescheduling at a time when he can be with us.

Please consider connecting with the new Teaching for Learning Center on social media to stay abreast of announcements and to share news and resources throughout the year.

Twitter: @T4LCMizzou
LinkedIn: T4LC University of Missouri

At this time, all of our programming for Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday remains intact. We look forwarding to seeing you there!

Monday 1-14-19 Faculty Writing Intensive Workshops
8:15 am – 3:00 pm

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John Bean (2011) notes the particular power of writing to help students wrestle with disciplinary content, and the Faculty Writing Intensive Workshop supports instructors in this disciplinary writing instruction.

 

The interactive workshop provides resources around the following topics:

  • Using informal writing to spark critical thinking
  • Designing diverse and effective writing assignments
  • Addressing how to respond to student writing
  • Assessing students’ final written products
  • Incorporating revision in the writing process and structuring peer review

We invite all prospective, novice, and veteran WI instructors to join our conversation.  Please bring a device. Lunch will be provided.

 

Presented by:

Campus Writing Program

 

Register here

Tuesday 1-15-19 Opening General Session:

SESSIONS CANCELLED

11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Great Room

Inclusive Excellence in Teaching for Learning: A Public Conversation

 

Join us as thought leaders from our own University of Missouri at Columbia, Drs. Woodson, Perry, and Erb, together with scholar/teacher/author, Dr. Stephen D. Brookfield, the John Ireland Endowed Chair at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis-St. Paul, reflect on the intersection(s) of teaching excellence, inclusion, diversity, and equity. These scholar-teachers will discuss what it means to “Teach For Learning,” and how inclusive pedagogy and curricula are evolving in their own teaching practice and among colleagues. Together, they will grapple with dilemmas and exploit tensions for a professional development experience not to be missed.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Colleagues interpret and reflect on the concept of inclusive excellence in the context of learning environments.
  2. Colleagues share evolving practices to actualize inclusive excellence in their teaching practice.
  3. Colleagues explore and analyze varied responses to dilemmas and tensions as an anticipated dimension of dynamic 21st century learning environments.ddddd

Presented by:

Dr. Stephen Brookfield, the John Ireland Endowed Chair at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Brookfield is the author of many highly acclaimed books.

Dr. Ashley Woodson, Assistant Professor of Education – College of Education

Dr. Earnest Perry, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Associate Professor, Journalism

Joseph Erb, MFA, Assistant Professor of Digital Storytelling, School of Visual Studies

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

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Colleague Cafe (registration required)
Enjoy lunch and exchange ideas on how to participate in the MLK Teach-In.
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

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Operationalizing Inclusive Excellence through Reflective Teaching Practices

 

In this workshop, Dr. Brookfield will serve as a provocateur and guide to help participants identify tangible ways to operationalize inclusive excellence in the teaching for learning process. Participants will share observations on pedagogic dynamics that serve or disrupt traditional power differentials. Participants will explore tools and strategies meant to serve all learners, especially underrepresented and underserved learners in achieving academic goals and overall success.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Colleagues identify and analyze places in their curricula and instruction where inclusive excellence can be enhanced.
  2. Colleagues examine scenarios and analyze how a learning environment may include or exclude learners.
  3. Colleagues produce ideas for inclusive teaching practices for specific instructional objectives.

Presented by:

Dr. Stephen Brookfield, the John Ireland Endowed Chair at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Brookfield is the author of many highly acclaimed books.

Wednesday 1-16-19
9:30 am – 10:45 am

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Integrating Career Competencies in your Course: Resources, Tips, & How-To’s

 

In this interactive session, participants will learn about a variety of ways in which they can integrate career-related competencies and information into courses, contributing to students’ lifelong career development and post-graduation success. Facilitators will also inform participants of updated campus career services and introduce them to the MU Career Development Network.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will leave with tools, techniques, and resources for integrating career development competencies and information into their courses.
  2. Participants will learn about the MU Career Development Network and how becoming a part of this network can help them answer students’ questions as well as provide appropriate referrals for students’ career-related needs.

Presented by:

Craig Benson, Assistant Director, MU Career Center

Carrie Collier, Senior Student Services Coordinator

11:00 am – 12:30 pm

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“Parts of Speech”

 

Drama pedagogy is an ideal conduit for multi-disciplinary exploration of complex topics. We invite you to engage with Mizzou’s Interactive Theatre Troupe, as they perform and draw in the audience to contribute to the sketch, “Parts of Speech.” Action! A grammar class is about to begin. Two students who have just encountered a zealous preacher exhorting students to renounce their sins, arrive to class debating issues of free speech. Next a conservative Christian student complains about terrorists in their midst, offending a Muslim student who is having a really bad day. The students start to engage in a dialogue about religious difference, but the instructor insists on continuing with today’s lesson, “dangling modifiers.” How would you intervene?

 

A Typical Performance

  1. The Scene:  a short research-based play demonstrates a complex human problem with no single solution.  This part is, in essence, traditional theatre:  an audience watching a ten-minute scene.
  2. Talk-Back:  following the scene, actors stay in character and respond to questions asked by the audience, who gain further insight into the problem.
  3. Intervention: Once the talkback is over, the scene is run again.  However, this time members of the audience have the chance to stop the scene and intervene; they may enter the scene as themselves or replace a character in the scene to try to solve the problem in a safe space. (Note: Our actors are trained not to attack the intervener but to make the resistance realistic.)
  4. Feedback:  the characters and the audience provide feedback to the spectator on her strategy.
  5. Discussion:  the audience engages in discussion of the issues raised by the play.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will critically reflect on various lenses to use when engaged in complex and potentially contentious topics in the learning environment.
  2. Participants will observe colleagues in action as they analyze how to best intervene to optimize the learning moment when conversations grow tense.
  3. Participants will co-create improvisational responses to redirect and reframe the faculty-student and student-student interactions.
  4. Participants will gain background information that may help them to understand and empathize with characters’ differing views on controversial issues.
  5. Participants will have the opportunity to “rehearse” teaching strategies and get feedback from students and colleagues.

Presented by:

The University of Missouri Interactive Theatre Troupe, under the direction of Suzanne Burgoyne

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm

Alcove

Box lunches provided by Mizzou Online (registration required)
1:00 pm – 2:20 pm

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Understanding the Ecotones of Your Class – Making Every Minute Count

 

This session will explore the edges of a traditional college class period. Ecotones are landscapes that sit on the edges of ecosystems and are known for having rich biological diversity and aid in the mixing between zones. The ecotone of a traditional college class are the first and last few minutes of the class session. This session will provide concrete examples of how to use this rich and fertile class time in a productive and meaningful fashion to maximize student learning.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be provided examples of how to use the opening and closing minutes of a class session to maximize student learning.
  2. Participants will brainstorm and create how they would structure ecotone activities for upcoming classes.

Presented by:

Dr. Beth Whitaker, Assistant Teaching Professor, Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

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Rock the First Day

 

Rock the first day 2019! In this exciting conversation on you will learn how (and why) to make the first day of class the most important day of the semester.  We will talk about how to use the first day (and before) to make essential connections that last the whole semester and then how to rock the last day too!

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will explore and brainstorm ideas and methods for engaging students on the first day of class and even before.
  2. Participants will analyze the engagement strategies in the context of their courses.

Presented by:

Dr. Steve Keller, Associate Professor of Chemistry

Deborah Huelsbergen, Curator’s Distinguished Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Visual Studies

Thursday 1-17-19
9:00 am – 9:50 am

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On or Off? Devices in the Classroom

 

Whether or not students should use laptops, smartphones, or other electronics in the classroom is a much-debated topic. For some, these devices are a learning tool, while for others they can be a distraction. This session will present MU-specific data on the role devices play in our students’ academic success and will invite discussion around the different perspectives and approaches on this topic.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the MU student demographic.
  2. Attendees will generate ideas for managing competing student classroom needs.

Presented by:

Eric Aldrich, Technology Resource Coordinator, Educational Technologies

Marc Lundstrom, Instructional Design Manager, Educational Technologies

Tanys Nelson, Learning Technologies Manager, Educational Technologies

10:00 am – 10:50 am

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ZOOM up your class!

 

During this session, you will learn from your colleagues about how they are teaching with this high-quality audio and video conferencing system that is accessible through Canvas.  Zoom shows real time audio and video of you and your students, and can provide screen and file sharing, text chat, and breakout rooms. Discover a rich, collaborative learning experience for you and your students, whether you are teaching students in person or fully online.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will explore ways in which Zoom can augment their teaching and enrich engagement opportunities with students and colleagues.

Presented by:

Courtney Cothren, Jo-Ana Chase and Heather Moulaison-Sandy

11:00 am – 11:50 am

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Open Pedagogy

 

Are your students struggling with the cost of course materials? Would you like to allow them to create and mashup content?  Open Educational Resources are an accessible and equitable alternative to traditional instructional materials and allow for creative new ways of teaching and learning.  Learn from your colleagues how they have successfully created or incorporated OER into their teaching, and what the benefits have been for them and their students.

 

Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants observe and analyze how the incorporation of OER contributes to the student learning experience.

Presented by:

Steve Keller, Jenna Wintemberg, Grace Atkins, Outreach & Open Education Librarian

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

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Collaboration Cafe (registration required)
Boxed lunches provided by Educational TechnologiesGreetings for Provost Latha Ramchand and the Teaching for Learning Center’s Advisory Board.Join colleagues for a fun and exciting opportunity to provide your ideas and suggestions for the new faculty support center
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

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A World of Exponential Changes

 

Architect, writer, educator, and author of the new two-volume ‘manual for change’, Design Unbound: Designing for Emergence in a White Water World, Ann Pendleton-Jullian engages us with her way of making sense of the world of today, which she refers to as a white water world. She offers a world view and set of tools “for navigating our broadly connected, rapidly changing, and radically contingent world.” These tools come from her own practice of working on complex problems and in complex systems environments, and from closely read case studies that she unpacks and reflects on to evolve this practice.

 

This 60-minute talk with question and answer period is about designing for change in a future that is fast-paced, hyper-connected, and uncertain. The concepts, metaphors, and tools will feed our conversations about the new T4LC’s catalytic role in our current and future teaching-for-learning ecosystem.

 

Presented by:

Ann Pendleton-Jullian, Professor, Architecture, The Ohio State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Georgetown University

1:45 pm – 5:00 pm

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What Stories Reveal (past into present)

 

In three-person story triangles, we will collect and curate stories of our experiences with teaching and learning, broadly construed.

 

Stories are personal. They entertain, but they also reveal perspectives, fears, dreams and how we assimilate experiences to construct ourselves as unique and social beings in the world. Personal and entertaining vignettes elucidate critical issues in poignant ways.

In the small groups, each participant will tell two stories based upon a prompt. The group will choose three of the six stories to rehearse and share with their larger group in no-more-than- two-minute renditions of them.

 

Through stories, we aim to understand the texture and details of our past and present engagement with the work we do as educators: for our students, for the community of Mizzou, for our own growth, etc,– the issues, concerns, hopes, fears that motivate and drive us in the world of today.

 

Presented by:

Ann Pendleton-Jullian, Professor, Architecture, The Ohio State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Georgetown University
Dr. Victoria Mondelli, Director, Teaching For Learning Center, University of Missouri

 

Friday 1-18-19
9:00 am – 9:30 am

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A World of Exponential Changes…”Nineteenth Century Origins Collide with the 21st Century: The Research University Conundrum”

 

This short talk is intended to set the stage for the day’s activities as it builds from the conversations on Thursday. Using an historical frame, it will put into context what we face as we attempt make structural changes in higher education, and how they are related to change in any complex, large-scale organization.

9:00 am – 11:30 am

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Present-into-Future Attitudes (Conversations with Pens)

 

In working groups of 4-5, we will explore four critical and foundational assumptions that drive how we all think about the university now and into the future. Teams will ‘define’ and elaborate on strategically ambiguous phrases. What do we see in these phrases. Each team will pick 3 of the 4 to work with.

 

Ambiguous Phrases:

  • Student partnerships
  • Dynamics of research
  • Alone together
  • Fill in the blank as you wish: the _______ edge. (e.g. cutting edge, leading, bleeding, selvage, etc.)

Presented by:

Ann Pendleton-Jullian, Professor, Architecture, The Ohio State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Georgetown University
Dr. Elliott Shore, Dean, Council on Library and Information Resources, Former Executive Director, Association of Research of Libraries
Dr. Victoria Mondelli, Director, Teaching For Learning Center, University of Missouri

11:30 am – 12:00 pm

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Box lunches provided by the Teaching for Learning Center. (registration required)
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

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Speculating Forward (Playing, with Pens)

 

While Thursday focuses on past experiences and how those effect motivations, actions and culture, and Friday morning focuses on understandings, assumptions and frames that are directly related to how one navigates the present, this future oriented. In working groups of 3-5, we will reconvene to spark imaginative speculation on the future of Mizzou, as a community, and in its greater context.

 

It is 2069 and you have been invited to your 30th reunion (you were Mizzou class of 2039). You have been asked to bring back an artifact from your time at Mizzou, which is now considered an ‘oasis’ for education in the 21st century.

 

Invent and depict this artifact. Each team will report out their findings briefly using as much detailed language, humor and drama that they can muster. This is meant to be a very quick energizing exercise in order to spark a pragmatic playfulness that relaxes constraints enough to speculate on a unique and idealized Mizzou.

 

Presented by:

Ann Pendleton-Jullian, Professor, Architecture, The Ohio State University; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Georgetown University
Dr. Elliott Shore, Dean, Council on Library and Information Resources, Former Executive Director, Association of Research of Libraries
Dr. Victoria Mondelli, Director, Teaching For Learning Center, University of Missouri

Writing Intensive Workshops
8:45 am – 12:00 pm

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TA Writing Intensive Workshop Morning Session

 

Hosted by:

Campus Writing Program

 

Details and Registration

12:45 pm – 4:00 pm

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TA Writing Intensive Workshop Afternoon Session

Hosted by:

Campus Writing Program

 

Details and Registration