Teaching Renewal Week 2020

Memorial Union, North Tower

Sponsored by Teaching For Learning Center

Register

Sessions Description

Monday, JAN. 13, 2020
8:00am – 3:00pm
N201C
CAMPUS WRITING PROGRAM Hosts: Amy Lannin, Christy Goldsmith, and Julie Birt

Teaching with Writing for Student Learning: 68th WI Faculty Workshop (lunch provided)

Are you interested in teaching with writing without drowning in the challenges of grading and extra work?

Interactive Sessions:

  • Using informal writing to spark critical thinking
  • Designing diverse and effective writing assignments
  • Addressing how to respond to student writing
  • Assessing students’ final written products
  • Incorporating revision in the writing process and structuring peer review

*Light Breakfast and Lunch provided. Vegetarian options will be available.

Presented by Campus Writing Program   RSVP here

Tuesday, JAN. 14, 2020
9:00 am – 10:50 am
N201 ABC
Teaching with Intention: Practical Strategies for Effective Teaching and Learning

Join us as we will think deeply about strategies and practices we can apply through intentional teaching for a positive impact on student learning and well-being across the disciplines.  This interactive workshop will cover common student stresses and the use of mindfulness in course design and implementation to create an effective classroom environment and maximize student success.

Two themes of engagement:

  • the existence and impact of student stress on learning and academic success
  • the application of mindfulness to course design, listening, and classroom management

The general goal of the session is to bring faculty members and instructors together to share practices around how we intentionally shape the learning environment to set up all learners for success, while maintaining academic rigor.

 Desired outcomes:

  • Describe several sources of student stress and how they may impact learning and academic success in the instructor’s course(s).
  • Describe how mindfulness can be used in a classroom setting to maximize student learning and address student stress.
  • Identify at least three ways in which mindfulness can be applied to the instructor’s course design, use of listening, and classroom management.

Presented by:  Dr. Christy Hutton, Licensed Psychologist, Associate Director for Student Services, Outreach and Prevention, Dr. Susan ONeill, Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychological Sciences

11:00 pm – 12:00 pm
Stotler Lounge
Keynote: Well-being in the Learning Environment (Yours and Theirs!): a new ethic of holistic care.

Join Vice Provost Bill Stackman to explore what it means to take on a holistic approach to student-centered teaching and learning. Consider questions like how do we encourage emotional well-being in the learning experience? What can faculty do to have a positive impact on this important facet student success?

Introduction by Dr. Jim Spain, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
LUNCH
Stotler Lounge
Task Force to Enhance Learning and Teaching (TFELT) Community Engagement
(plated-lunch sponsored by T4LC)Remarks by Provost Ramchand at 12:15.Hear from members of the Task Force for Enhancing Learning and Teaching as they unveil the new provisional definition for Teaching Effectiveness at MU, with five essential dimensions. Next, join colleagues at this working lunch to contribute to improving our approach for conducting summative peer review of teaching. A small group activity is planned to draft of a rubric intended to guide face-to-face classroom observations. (N.B. At a future session, a rubric for peer review of online teaching will also be developed with important modality-specific elements.) Prizes will be raffled! Discussion & activity led by:
Casandra Harper-Morris, Associate Professor, ELPA
Brian Houston, Associate Professor & Chair, Dept. of Communication
Bethany Stone, Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences                                                                                                                        Tori Mondelli, Director of the Teaching for Learning Center
1:40 pm – 2:40 pm
N214 ABC1:40 pm – 4:00 pm
N214 DE
Concurrently:

Expanding Student Involvement in Curricular Design

Current literature in higher education advocates for educators to encourage students to be active co-creators of their own learning.  In co-creation, the educator and students work in a collaborative and reciprocal relationship to construct components of the curriculum.

Desired outcomes:

  • Review evidence supporting co-creation
  • Learn strategies for including students in curricular design
  • Share outcomes related to co-curricular experience

Presented by Whitney Henderson, Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy

Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment Pilot Onboarding Session (attendance pre-determined)

Description: Just as our students need low-stakes feedback to improve their learning, we need low-stakes feedback to improve our teaching.  Towards that end, the Task Force for Enhancing Learning and Teaching (TFELT) and the Teaching for Learning Center are piloting a new Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment program.  This session is to inform participating instructors and administrators on the details of this pilot.

Desired outcomes:

  • Discuss a brief history of the Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment program
  • Review the timeline for the pilot
  • Engage in an activity to review and give feedback on the current draft of the peer review rubric
  • Ask and answer questions

Hosted by the Teaching for Learning Center

2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
N201 ABC
Taking It Outside: Using Green Space to Improve Student Learning and Well-being

In this session, participants will be introduced to principles from the science of embodied cognition, which explores the role of the body and of the environment in shaping the brain’s processes. The principle of biophilia explains our innate attraction to natural and to other living beings, including plant life. Cognitive performance, including measures of attentiveness, concentration, memory restoration, perception, and responsiveness, has been shown to increase during exposure to natural elements. We will share a series of examples, including student responses to single-class assignments and to more immersive experiences.

Desired outcomes:

  • identify potential challenges and opportunities in adapting indoor classroom strategies to outdoor spaces
  • brainstorm ideas for using campus green spaces for a range of learning activities, in a variety of disciplines. From my own practice and current research,
  • prepare an action plan for one experimental outdoor learning activity: where, when, how, and with whom.

Presented by Susan Hrach, (via Zoom) Professor of English and Director of the Faculty Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at Columbus State University.

Wednesday, JAN. 15, 2020
9:00 am – 10:20 am

N201 ABC

Energize your Syllabus

Are you tired of students not reading the syllabus or not being able to navigate your course? Learn about options for designing your course syllabus so it communicates essential information and facilitates student success. We will look at the ways to present the course calendar, “big ideas,” outcome maps, and graphic syllabus formats.  For example, the graphic syllabus can convey the same information in a visual way using the language of graphics. The outcomes map can be presented as a flowchart that shows students how their knowledge and skills will progress and be assessed during the course. Please bring syllabi to edit.

Desired Outcomes:

  • Learn new ideas and strategies for providing essential information
  • Learn about the pedagogical power of graphics and how the old syllabus can be made more appealing and therefore used to energize teaching.
  • See examples of graphic syllabi and outcomes maps that they can use to set up their own.

Presented by Dorina Kosztin, Teaching Professor, Associate Chair, Physics and
Amy Lannin, Director of the Campus Writing Program

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N214ABN214 CDE

Concurrently:

Being Interactive in the Classroom:  Keeping Students Engaged

As an instructor, we tend to hear that a better way to teach is to engage your students.  While that is great advice, exactly how do you do that?  Learn from colleagues what they do in their classes to get this accomplished.

Desired outcomes:

  • Learn about tools and techniques for how to engage with your students
  • Learn about tools and techniques for how to have students engage with each other
  • Discover ways to use technology to reach students outside of the traditional classroom setting

Presented by Eric Aldrich, Associate Professor of Meteorology and Technology Resource Coordinator and Jenna Wintemberg, Assistant Professor, School of Health Professions.

 

Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment Pilot Onboarding Session  (attendance pre-determined)

Description: Just as our students need low-stakes feedback to improve their learning, we need low-stakes feedback to improve our teaching.  Towards that end, the Task Force for Enhancing Learning and Teaching (TFELT) and the Teaching for Learning Center are piloting a new Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment program.  This session is to inform participating instructors and administrators on the details of this pilot.

Desired outcomes:

  • Discuss a brief history of the Show-me Teaching for Learning Formative Assessment program
  • Review the timeline for the pilot
  • Engage in an activity to review and give feedback on the current draft of the peer review rubric
  • Ask and answer questions

Hosted by the Teaching for Learning Center

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
N201 ABC
Colleague Café: (boxed lunches provided by Mizzou Online)

Office of eLearning: Services and Introductions

1:00 pm – 2:20 pm

N214 AB

Strategies to Support Effective & Efficient Grading

You will be guided you through how to effectively respond to your students with grace and elegance. We’ll explore what works and what doesn’t, and we’ll learn about some of the best tools to save you time and energy.

Desired Outcomes:

  • Participants should be able to identify and describe the most effective ways to respond to student work.
  • Participants should be able to demonstrate effective responses to sample student work.
  • Participants should be able to identify and apply text-expansion software to increase their efficiency when responding to student work.

Presented by Amy Lannin, Director of the Campus Writing Program and Jonathan Cisco, Associate Director of the Teaching for Learning Center

2:30 pm –3:20 pm
N201 ABC
Inclusive Teaching: How to Build and Sustain an Inclusive Climate

In this hour-long interactive workshop, we will do the following:

  1. Discuss and identify what constitutes an inclusive climate
  2. Propose practical strategies for creating and sustaining an inclusive climate

Presented by: Lydia Bentley, Associate Director of the Teaching for Learning Center and

Astrid Villamil, Associate Director of Professional Development & Sr. Learning & Development Consultant

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

N214 AB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N214 CDE

CONCURRENTLY:
Planning for Inclusion using an Online WhiteboardReasons why a student may miss class can range from the mundane, such as missing a shuttle, to the serious, such as chronic health issues. An online whiteboard can help to mitigate the effects of missing class by recording activities completed during class—such as discussion, writing on a physical whiteboard, or presenting slides—in an environment that students can interact with both during and after class. Together, we will explore how an online whiteboard can help facilitate various activities in face-to-face classes.Participants are encouraged to bring an internet-capable device to the session but it is not required (a tablet or laptop is recommended but a smartphone will also work).Desired Outcomes:

  1. Participants will learn how to use features of the online whiteboard
  2. Participants will collaboratively determine how an online whiteboard could be integrated in courses they teach
  3. Participants will evaluate to what extent an online whiteboard could help accommodate anticipated student needs

Presented by Peter Lea, Assistant Teaching Professor of Music Theory, School of Music

 

Nurture the doodle: using coloring, drawing and play to focus and refresh

This will be a hand-on workshop discussing the idea behind using drawing, coloring, repetitive mark making and play to both relieve stress and focus attention. We will talk about mandalas and how creating them can be a form of meditation. We will chat and practice these things together.

Desired outcomes:

  • leave the workshop more refreshed and focused than when you entered
  • understand the value of drawing and coloring and how you can use it in both your interactions with students and your own life

Presented by Deborah Huelsbergen, Curator’s Distinguished Teaching Professor, Art program – Graphic Design, School of Visual Studies

Thursday, JAN. 16, 2020
10:00 am – 11:50 am

N201C

Becoming an Educator: Bringing Research-Based Teaching to Your Classroom

Are you new or relatively new to your teaching journey? Start your journey on the right foot by learning what the scholarship says about best practices for designing and conducting your classroom. We’ll explore your challenges or fears about teaching, how to create solid course designs, and how to navigate difficult conversations in your classroom.

This workshop is designed for any graduate student or new faculty member looking to improve their teaching. All disciplines welcome.

Desired outcomes:

  • Reflect on their concerns about the higher education classroom.
  • Create course level outcomes for an introductory course in their disciplines.
  • Discuss the best approaches for navigating challenging conversations in the classroom.

Presented by Jonathan Cisco, Associate Director for the Teaching for Learning Center and Ransford Pinto, Ph.D. Candidate, Graduate Research Assistant for the Teaching for Learning Center

12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
N201C
CAMPUS WRITING PROGRAM Hosts: Amy Lannin, Christy Goldsmith, and Julie Birt

TA Writing Intensive Workshop (lunch provided –co-sponsored by the Graduate School and CWP)

Teaching assistants are an integral part of Writing Intensive courses; as such, this workshop provides resources to help TAs manage the special demands of Writing Intensive courses. We welcome novice, veteran, and prospective TAs to attend this session.

Desired outcomes:

  • practice assessing student writing and norming grades with colleagues
  • balance content and mechanics in the assessment process
  • try out strategies for conferencing with students about their writing
  • learn about resources to support peer review in small group or discussion sections

Presented by Campus Writing Program Staff. RSVP here

8:00 am – 4:30pm
New Historical Society
The MU Office of Research and Economic Development is offering a free two-day workshop on the Fundamentals of Being a Principal Investigator.

Sessions will guide you through the research development process from submission to project management.  The workshop will also feature dynamic presentations from Andrew Minigan Director of Strategy for the NSF-funded Right Question Institute on how to create transformative research questions for your next proposal.  Breakfast and lunch will be provided both days.  Information is appropriate for researchers at all stages of their career.  For more information, contact us at theconnector@missouri.edu.

RSVP here: https://r2.dotmailer-surveys.com/5e42n522-bb4ene6

Friday, JAN. 17, 2020
8:00 am – 1:00pm
New Historical Society
The MU Office of Research and Economic Development is offering a free two-day workshop on the Fundamentals of Being a Principal Investigator.

Sessions will guide you through the research development process from submission to project management.  The workshop will also feature dynamic presentations from Andrew Minigan Director of Strategy for the NSF-funded Right Question Institute on how to create transformative research questions for your next proposal.  Breakfast and lunch will be provided both days.  Information is appropriate for researchers at all stages of their career.  For more information, contact us at theconnector@missouri.edu.

RSVP here: https://r2.dotmailer-surveys.com/5e42n522-bb4ene6

 

Ancillary activities: Book drawing, Resource table, Hospitality suite, registration/info table

Parking information: MU faculty and staff need to call MU Parking and Transportation at 573 882-4568 to obtain permission to park in Hitt Street Parking Structure, not level 4.