2017 Celebration of Teaching

Sponsored by Teaching For Learning Center

Keynote May 16, 2017
Time Event Location

Dr. Freeman Hrabowski

Dr. Freeman Hrabowski

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on
minority participation and performance. Freeman A. Hrabowski chaired the National Academies’ committee that
produced the recent report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and
Technology Talent at the Crossroads.

 

Reception May 16, 2017
Time Event Location
2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Campus Authors

Tell us about your 2016 publication!

The Mizzou Store partners with the eighth annual Celebration of Teaching Conference to host a reception
honoring MU faculty and staff with domestic trade and academic press publications. If you have authored a
publication in 2016, please submit your information. We will include your work during the
reception on Tuesday, May 16, 2017, in the Rotunda of Jesse Hall. Click here for more information about Campus Authors.

Poster Sessions

In addition to mingling with campus authors, you will also be able to visit with several great groups that
support your teaching at Mizzou. Be sure to grab your refreshments and visit these departments.

This reception will follow a keynote presentation by Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, which
begins at 1 p.m. in Jesse Hall Auditorium.

Jesse Hall’s Rotunda

 

Pre-Conference Workshops May 16, 2017
Time Event Location
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

StoryMythos: A Movie Guide to Better Business Stories

Shane Meeker

Storytelling is the foundation of human understanding and has always defined true authenticity. For
centuries it has been said that you don’t influence people through intellect, you do it through emotion. A
great story IS emotion. It is how to truly build empathy and understanding and is the strongest motivation
to action. A great story ensures passion and memorability. The same principles and insights that make your
favorite stories on stage, page and screen can be used to develop strong branded innovations, meaningful
consumer experiences, inspiring communications or just a more immersive powerpoint.

Did you know that your favorite movies can be one of your biggest business building tools? Do you
understand the critical relationship between Glenda the Good Witch and your brand? Do you know how the
Marvel Cinematic Universe can inspire your 10 year product plan? Do you know how an arch villain like Darth
Vader can help you evaluate the true power of your next technology launch? Do you understand how Star Trek
changed the world of business communications forever? My presentations and workshops teach how to pull
apart what works in your favorite movies and create more vivid, powerful business stories. I cover the
foundations and principles behind the greatest stories along with understanding the importance of
“telling”, not “selling” your ideas. We will explore how story structures can be used across an infinite
array of business problems ranging from strategy, to branding to overall better communications with
important stakeholders. Finally we move into the process of creating your stories by learning and
practicing some “Hollywood-esque” tools and approaches that can make your stories richer, more focused and
emotionally engaging.

Presented by:

Shane Meeker – Corporate Storyteller and Company Historian, Procter & Gamble

Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Incorporating Sustainability within Curriculum

Given the unique challenges facing society today, it is imperative for higher education to provide the
necessary skills to students – tomorrow’s journalists, business leaders, engineers, scientists – to shape
existing communities into sustainable societies. Ensuring this will require a significant increase in
courses that incorporate sustainability concepts. As the state’s premier land-grant and research
institution, MU is in a unique position to develop the “Campus as a Living Lab” concept and lead the way in
innovative interdisciplinary sustainability curricula.

Presented by:

Srinivasan Raghavan – MU Sustainability Manager, Sustainability Office
Christine Costello – Assistant Research Professor, Bioengineering, College of
Engineering
Keith Goyne – Associate Professor & Associate Director, School of Natural
Resources

Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

You’ve Got This! Confidence with Canvas

This session will equip instructors with vital information about teaching with Canvas and allow them time
to work on their course. Come to learn about key differences between Blackboard and Canvas, as well as
Canvas features that many instructors and students really like.

  • Get answers to common questions that instructors have when migrating to Canvas.
  • Speak with instructors who have already started using Canvas.
  • Bring your laptop/device and work with your course content.

This session will include a short presentation with Q&A and a hands-on workshop where instructors can
work in small groups with experienced instructors, instructional designers, and technology specialists.

Presented by:

Educational Technologies at Missouri (ET@MO) Staff

Reynolds Alumni Center

 

Featured Presentation May 17, 2017
Time Event Location
8:30 AM – 9:50 AM Breakfast will begin at 8:30 a.m. Awards presentation will begin at 9 a.m. – 9:50 a.m. You will have a
chance to hear from award winning instructors. Join the conversation and learn what they do to make
teaching for learning successful and apply to your own teaching.

 

Concurrent Sessions May 16, 2017
Time Event Location
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Panel Discussion on Online Teaching

Members of this panel represented the University of Missouri at the Conference on Distance Education and Learning in Madison, Wisconsin in July of 2016. We’ll be discussing the role of online education in our colleges and programs, the benefits and challenges associated with online education, and the qualities of an outstanding online educator.

Presented by:

Laurie Wallace – Adjunct Teaching Associate Professor & Director of Online Program, Dean of Veterinary Medicine
Cheryl Ann Hill – Assistant Teaching Professor, Department of Pathology & Anatomical Sciences
Mark Kuhnert – Associate Teaching Professor, Health Sciences, School of Health Professions
Miriam Butler – Assistant Teaching Professor, School of Nursing
Kerri McBee-Black – Instructor, Department of Textile & Apparel Management

Room 205
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Ethics in College Teaching: An Introduction

This session is intended to provide an introduction to ethical considerations in college teaching. Frameworks for ethics in college teaching will be reviewed, and participants will have an opportunity to reflect on their own ethical beliefs using cases written by Costanzo and Handelsman (1998).

Presented by:

Jennifer Fellabaum-Toston – Assistant Teaching Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis

Room 206
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Documenting Your Program Outcomes

This presentation will focus on how the Information Science program in the School of Information Science & Learning Technologies is transforming reporting using a combination of student portfolios and the new Outcomes module in Canvas. We will focus on the process that are currently going through in order to demonstrate mastery of the student learning outcomes for our program. We will focus on gathering statistics, faculty workload and buy-in, student expectations, and outcomes for the first semester.

Presented by:

Jenny Bossaller – Associate Professor, School of Information Science & Learning Technologies
Denice Adkins – Associate Professor, School of Information Science & Learning Technologies

Room 211
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Using Print Anything 3D Printing in Your Class

3D printing is an exciting way to rapidly prototype ideas, from medical devices to new consumer products. However, the actual printing process can be more art than science. Enter Print Anything at MU, a service of MU Libraries that handles the hard work of operating 3D printers. In this presentation, teaching professor Christianson will outline how to incorporate 3D printing projects in a wide range of lessons: team development, consumer testing, design, etc. Mr. Frier will discuss the range of services and tools that are available from Print Anything. Participants will also learn about tinkercad, a free and easy-to-use tool for 3D design.

Presented by:

J Scott Christianson – Assistant Teaching Professor, Management, College of Business
Nikolaus Frier – Student, Mechanical Engineering

Room 212
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Teaching Sensitive Subjects: Pedagogical Practices in History, Writing, and Empathy

This session will discuss the development and implementation of a history sophomore seminar focused on the transatlantic slave trade. The course, created with support from the MU Campus Writing Program, provided students with an opportunity to relive the events leading up to Great Britain’s 1807 Slave Trade Act abolishing it s traffic in enslaved Africans. Students took on the role of research assistants to Thomas Clarkson’s Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade, and retraced the abolitionists steps to end the traffic by conducting a series of research and writing-intensive activities. They also maintained a journal in which they recorded their adventures as integral members of this quest. The course allowed for a transformative experience, in which students examined this tragic history through different eyes and sought its truth for themselves.

Presented by:

Daniel Domingues da Silva – Assistant Professor, Department of History
Sarah Jolley – Student, English
Kyle Myers – Student, History
Katelyn Ziegler – Student, History

Room 217
10:00 AM – 10:50 AM

Teach Students How to Learn

No time to read? Get the inside scoop on “Teach Students how to Learn” by Saundra Yancy McGuire with Stephanie McGuire. Strategies you can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. A panel of Mizzou instructors read this book and would love to share what they learned with you.

Presented by:

Enos Inniss – Assistant Teaching Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering
Sarah Buchanan – Assistant Professor, School of Information Science & Learning Technologies
Linda Lair – Assistant Clinical Professor & Director of Clinal Education, School of Health Professions
Amy Underwood – PhD Student, Psychology

Room 218
11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Panel Discussion about Large Lecture Classes

Do you teach a large lecture class, but you struggle to connect with your students? Are you looking for ways to engage your students in a fun and interactive way? Curious how other instructors handle disruptions, strange excuses and reasons for missing class/exams? Come to a panel (group) discussion where some of MU’s most seasoned large lecture instructors share their tips, tricks and success stories.

Presented by:

Eric Aldrich – Technology Resource Coordinator, ET@MO, VP Undergraduate studies

Room 206
11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Much Ado About Something: 5E Learning Cycle and Canvas

This session will show the use of the 5E Learning Cycle as an instructional design model in two online biology courses on Canvas. In these 2 courses, the 5E Learning Cycle is a model that presents a framework for Constructivist Learning Theory. The session will begin with a brief overview of what research states about the Constructivist Learning Theory as an online course pedagogy and an overview of the Learning Cycle. Participants will engage in a sample set of 5e Learning Cycle activities that are currently used in these online biology courses. Participants will brainstorm ideas to integrate the learning cycle into their own courses.

Presented by:

Robin Hurst – Associate Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences

Room 211
11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Flourishing with Your Students with Mental Health Concerns

This session aims to help faculty/staff to develop an increased understanding of students well-being and its impact on students’ academic performance. It cultivates faculty’ flexibility in teaching and providing advice for their students, with a special focus on minority, international and first year college students.

Presented by:

Phoebe Wan – Licensed Psychologist, Student Health Center

Room 217
11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Evaluate Your Teaching Using the Teaching Practices Inventory Tool

The Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) was designed to characterize the teaching practices used in undergraduate “lecture” courses. The inventory can be valuable for instructors to use on their own for evaluating and improving their teaching; they can identify practices that they are not using and that have been shown to improve learning. Participants should bring a laptop, tablet, or smart phone to participate in a reflective activity using the TPI.

Presented by:

Sarah Bush – Teaching Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Dorina Kosztin – Teaching Professor & Associate Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Bethany Stone – Teaching Associate Professor, Biological Sciences

Room 218
11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Defining the Faculty Role in Student Success

* Please note that this session will be repeated in the afternoon.

Presented by:

Nina Lyon Bennett

Room 219
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Award Luncheon

Celebrating 2016 Kemper Fellows: Mary Beck, Sarah Bush, Robert O’Connell, Earnest L. Perry Jr. and Alexandra Socarides

Reynolds Alumni Center
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

How Do We Assess the Effectiveness of Instructional Videos in an Online Course?

The use of video as an instructional tool has become commonplace in higher education, and is an especially popular method for delivering content in online classes. Research has demonstrated that by following recognized best practices for instructional media design, learners will demonstrate an active engagement with course media while also achieving intended learning outcomes. As all-online, media-heavy courses continue to become more prevalent, there is a need to understand how learners interact with large numbers of instructional videos presented in a variety of formats throughout an entire course term. This session will take a holistic view of an online engineering class which delivers its instructional content through a large number of videos, specifically focusing on how the successful implementation of best practices for the design of instructional media can effectively teach the course learning concepts in terms of student engagement, student enthusiasm, and achieved student learning outcomes.

Presented by:

Heather Hunt – Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering, Collge of Engineering
Brad MItchell – Media Production Coordinator, ET@MO, VP Undergraduate Studies

Room 205
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Supporting Student Learning: An Introduction to Learning Outcomes

This session is an introduction to learning outcomes. In addition to defining learning outcomes and why they are important, this session will introduce a model for writing learning outcomes and address common challenges. There will also be an individual activity where participants will be asked to identify key components of learning outcomes using the aforementioned model. Time permitting, we will conclude with a discussion of next steps, including a look at curriculum mapping.

Presented by:

Jennifer Fellabaum-Toston – Assistant Teaching Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis
Laura Page – PhD Student, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis

Room 211
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Facilitating Seven Ways of Learning

No time to read a good book? No worries, this panel presentation will provide you with all the information in the book “Facilitating Seven Ways of Learning: A Resource for More Purposeful, Effective, and Enjoyable College Teaching” For teachers in higher education who haven’t been able to catch up with developments in teaching and learning, James Davis and Bridget Arend offer an introduction that focuses on seven coherent and proven evidence-based strategies. The underlying rationale is to provide a framework to match teaching goals to distinct ways of learning, based on well-established theories of learning.

Presented by:

Sharlette Anderson – Clinical Associate Professor & Clinical Coordinator, Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound, School of Health Professions
Laurie Kingsley – Associate Teaching Professor, Learning, Teaching & Curriculum, College of Education
Crystal Gateley – Associate Teaching Professor & Associate Chair, Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions
Steve Klien – Assistant Teaching Professor, Communication
Andrea Heiss – Associate Professor & Director of Arts-In-Depth Program, School of Journalism
Ashton Speno – Post Doctoral Fellow, Communication

Room 212
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Course, Classroom, and Lesson Design: Flipped Classroom Exercises, Online Assessments, and Customized Individual Research

This is a hands-on workshop that will demonstrate the pedagogy used to deliver course instruction for an International Management course. The presenter will show how the course is designed, overview the syllabus, demonstrate several lesson plans, and use publisher resources and scholarly databases to create in-class exercises and homework. The presentation is designed for instructors who are looking for alternative and creative approaches to teaching a course that increases student classroom attendance and engagement, and, allow customized learning paths for each learner. The use of online resources to deliver lectures, homework, and assessments is demonstrated. The design of classroom exercises and method of discussion is demonstrated to illustrate how Millennials use peer-to-peer teaching to deliver meaningful and memorable knowledge to one another.

Presented by:

Tim Waid – Associate Teaching Professor, Management, College of Business
Gwen Gray – Social Sciences Librarian, MU Libraries

Room 217
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Upping Your Grading Toolbox

This session will model the use of the various Canvas grading tools that are used extensively in my online courses to personalize student learning; rubrics, video/voice/text feedback, and Zoom (a new Canvas interactive video feature). Sample assignments, student work, and feedback with the aid of each of these Canvas grading tools will be provided. Participants will be guided through how to use commentary with rubrics, video/voice/text feedback, and Zoom to allow personalized feedback. Student surveys and course evaluation feedback on each of these tools will also be provided.

Presented by:

Robin Hurst – Associate Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences

Room 218
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Defining the Faculty Role in Student Success

More information to come.

Presented by:

Nina Lyon Bennett

Room 219
3:00 PM – 3:50 PM

Significantly Backwards

How do you take your expertise and your discipline content and shape it into an actual course with assessments and discussions and instructional content and all that “stuff” that courses are supposed to have? That process starts with figuring out what you want your learners to still be able to do years after your course ends, and from that starting point, assembling the necessary pieces to meet that vision. In this session, we will use Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning to develop holistic learning objectives, and then using Wiggins and McTighe’s Backwards Design Model turn those objectives into the skeleton of an actual course. Participants will leave with a working knowledge of Fink and Backwards Design and a basic plan for (re)designing one of the courses they teach.

Presented by:

Jerod Quinn – Instructional Designer-Specialist, ET@MO, VP Undergraduate Studies

Room 205
3:00 PM – 3:50 PM

Redesign of a Science Class for Majors — Lessons from Failure and Success

This session will discuss ways to redesign upper-level and major science classes from the viewpoint of a scientist. While many scientists agree in general with the idea of active learning and reformed teaching practices, they often are at a loss how to implement these aspects into their teaching. This session will present experience and lessons learned from a recent re-design of an Evolution course here at Mizzou.

Presented by:

Johannes Schul – Professor, Biological Sciences

Room 206
3:00 PM – 3:50 PM

Teaching With Writing

In this session, participants will learn about effective writing intensive courses from across the disciplines. Key elements of assignment design and pedagogical practices will be shared as well as resources for teaching with writing.

Presented by:

Amy Lannin – Assistant Professor & Director, Campus Writing Program
Lina Trigos-Carrillo – Post Doctoral Fellow & Coordinator, Campus Writing Program

Room 211
3:00 PM – 3:50 PM

Group Projects in Online Classes: Can They Work?

Group projects are too important to our students’ overall learning experience for us not to use group work in our online classes. The session will discuss the inherent challenges of student collaboration online. It will present a couple successful models, and share a few tools that can assist all of us with managing group work in our online classes.

Presented by:

Mauro Palmero – Assistant Teaching Professor, Hospitality Management, College of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Room 212
3:00 PM – 3:50 PM

Course Analytics: A Weapon or a Tool

Whether faculty teach 100% face to face, 100% online, or somewhere in between, utilization of the course analytics available through the newly adopted Canvas LMS brings a wealth of information to improve the educational experience for students, monitor performance and engagement, and evaluate teaching and testing methods.

Presented by:

Monica Schibig – Program Director & Associate Clinical Professor, Respiratory Therapy, School of Health Professions

Room 218