2018 Celebration of Teaching

Sponsored by Teaching For Learning Center

Keynote May 15, 2018
Time Event Location
1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Featured Keynote: Eric Mazur

Dr. Eric Mazur

Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Dean of Applied Physics at
Harvard University, Member of the Faculty of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and
President Elect of the Optical Society.

Jesse Hall Auditorium

 

Reception
Time Event Location
2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

CAMPUS AUTHORS AND GRADUATE TEACHING POSTER SESSION

Mix and mingle immediately following the keynote address. MU’s Campus Authors will be displaying their
publications during this reception. All publications will be available for purchase.   Also, talk with
graduate students and post-doctoral scholars who are participating in the MU STAR program as they showcase
their work.  You will also get to mingle with campus departments who are here to support you in your
great work.

 

Poster Sessions

Working in Groups in an Online Learning Environment: Can it be Done? Yes, it can!
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Mauro Palmero

MU Connect: A Faculty/Staff Perspective on How it Works
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Eric Aldrich

Coloring Across Campus: Integrating Creativity in Your Courses
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Kelli Hansen, Sarah Buchanan, Nicole Johnston, Jean Parsons

Library Resources and Support for Teaching
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Navadeep Khanal, Joseph Askins, Kimberly Moeller

Engaging Higher Education Students in Coursework Through Evidence-supported Strategies
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Greg Cox

 

MU STAR Sessions

Cultivating Identity and Relevance in Active Learning: A Preliminary Exploration of Teaching in a
Data Driven Statistics Course

Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Ruchi Bhattacharya, PhD, Terrell R. Morton, PhD

Enhance and Assess Students’ High-Order Thinking through Teaching Socio-Scientific Issues
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Hai Nguyen

Motivation in the Apparel Design Classroom – A Self-determination Perspective
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Claudine Barner

Examining reflexive practice and community-engaged learning in “Seeds of Equity: Exploring race,
class, and gender in our food system”

Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Sarah Cramer, MPH; Leslie Touzeau, Dr. Mary Hendrickson, PhD

Effectiveness of CowGames to increase student engagement, motivation, and learning gains
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Maria Haag

Evaluating transformative experience in undergraduate Educational Psychology
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Amanda Hoffman

Comparing the effects of teacher-generated to student-generated study guides on student outcomes
within an interteach framework.

Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Bethany Contreras

The Effectiveness of Student Participation in a Flipped Classroom Course Design on Occupational
Therapy Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Learning

Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Lyndi Plattner

Exploring Affective Learning in an Undergraduate Information Literacy Course Using Fink’s Taxonomy
and the ACRL Framework

Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Devon Wetstone

Mathematics Discussions in College Classrooms: An Exploratory Study
Location: Rotunda, Jesse Hall
Time: 2:30 – 4:00 PM
Wenmin Zhao

Jesse Hall Rotunda

 

Pre-Conference Workshops
Time Event Location
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Structured Uncertainty: Establishing creative openings in your classroom

What role does creative expression play in educational environments? At first blush it may appear that
creative thought and action plays little to no role. This is because what students learn in classroom
settings is often highly planned and predetermined. Inviting creative expression into such a context,
therefore, may seem like a recipe for curricular chaos.

This workshop will demonstrate that there is a way to strike a balance between designing predetermined and
to-be-determined curricular experiences. More specifically, we will discuss how providing students with
opportunities to engage with uncertainty in an otherwise supportive and structured learning environment
serves as a catalyst for creative expression. We will also explore how instructors can draw on the concept
of “lesson unplanning” (Beghetto, 2017) to design educational experiences conducive to creative expression.
Participants will have an opportunity to rework existing instructional activities and assignments based on
the principles outlined in the workshop.

 

Presented by:

Ron Beghetto

Ron Beghetto – professor of educational psychology and director of the Innovation
House, University of Connecticut

Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Anxiety, Stress, Trauma! The Hidden Learning Disabilities

At least 30% of students have enough anxiety or stress to impair learning. Those suffering from trauma,
including immigrant students and refugees, have even more academic challenges due to stress. High stress
impairs thinking and learning that can negatively impact academic performance. Learn how to reduce this
obstacle to achievement.

Learn from an Educational Neuroscientist what is happening, why it is happening and what you can do to
reduce stress in yourself and in students. Engage in activities that will reduce your stress in the moment
and give you continued tools for stress reduction. Fire students up with positive motivation and wire them
up with new strategies for continued and increased resilience. Discover how to create a trauma-sensitive
classroom that can improve learning for all students.

 

Presented by:

Janet Zadina

Janet Zadina – neuroscientist, author, consultant

Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Making large lecture STEM (and other) classes more active, inclusive, efficient, and less work

The use of formal group work in large lecture classes with enrollment up to 400 can result in astonishing
and significant changes in the classroom atmosphere and culture. Students, in particular those from
underrepresented groups, are more willing to talk, feel part of the classroom community, are more engaged,
and have higher attendance. This session introduces ways to organize regular, formal group work in large
lecture settings to achieve such outcomes. Topics include how and why groups should be assembled, the
mechanics in the classroom, and strategies to reduce the workload for grading and class preparation. Also,
the basics of ‘backwards design,’ strategies for writing and using learning objectives, and how to align
class activities (lecture, group work, readings) and assessments (exams and informal) with the learning
objectives will be discussed. Following these course design strategies assures that all instructional
activities (including group work and active learning) contribute to the learning objectives. Careful
development of learning objectives and alignment with instruction allows the use of active learning in
large classes without a reduction in the overall scope of the course. Thus, active learning does not lead
to a loss of ‘valuable lecture time,’ as all activities contribute to clearly defined learning objectives.

 

Presented by:

Sarah Bush

Sarah Bush, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri

Johannes Schul

Johannes Schul, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri

Bethany Stone

Bethany Stone, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri

Reynolds Alumni Center

 

Featured Presentations May 16, 2018
Time Event Location
9:00 AM – 9:50 AM

Understanding the Ecotones of Your Class – Making Every Minute Count

This session will explore the edges of a traditional college class period . Ecotones are landscapes that
sit on the edges of ecosystems and are known for having rich biological diversity and aid in the mixing
between zones. The ecotone of a traditional college class are the first and last few minutes of the class
session. This session will provide concrete examples of how to use this rich and fertile class time in a
productive and meaningful fashion to maximize student learning.

 

Presented by:
Beth Whitaker

Columns C, Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 9:50 AM

“The Discussion Book”

No time to read? Get the inside scoop on “The Discussion Book: 50 great ways to get people talking” by
Stephen D. Brookfield and Stephen Preskill. Learn about the techniques that will engage all types of
learners. Walk away with ideas that might transform how you lead, manage, teach and facilitate. Some of
these ideas may transfer into personal life to help with your work/life balance. A panel of Mizzou
instructors read this book and would love to share what they learned with you.

 

Presented by:
Mauro Palmero, Jennifer Fellabaum-Toston, Anna Valiavska, Angela Tennison

Columns A&B, Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 9:50 AM

“Make it stick”

No time to read? Get the inside scoop on “Make it stick” by Peter C. Brown, Henry Roediger III, and Mark
McDaniel. Learn new cognitive scientific strategies to engage real-world learning. Walk away with ideas
that might improve how we can all become more effective teachers, coaches and learners from panel of Mizzou
instructors who read this book. They will share what they learned with you.

 

Presented by:
Chelsea Deroche, Janell Stormo, Sarah Humfled, Lisa Groshong, Yun Zhang

Columns D&E, Reynolds Alumni Center
9:00 AM – 9:50 AM

Using Group work to make your large lecture STEM (and non-STEM) class more active, inclusive, and less
work

The use of group work in large lecture classes with enrollment up to 400 can result in astonishing and
significant changes in the classroom atmosphere and culture. Students, in particular those from
underrepresented groups, are more willing to talk, feel part of the class room community, are more engaged,
and have higher attendance. In this session, we introduce ways to organize regular group work in large
lecture settings to achieve such outcomes. Topics include how and why groups should be assembled, the
mechanics in the classroom (distribution and collection of materials, seating arrangements, running
classroom wide discussions), and strategies to reduce the workload for grading and class preparation. We
will also discuss how group work can be designed to cover important course content, so that it does not
lead to a reduction of the overall scope of the course.

 

Presented by:
Johannes Schul, Bethany Stone, Sarah Bush

TO Wright Room, Reynolds Alumni Center

 

Concurrent Sessions
Time Event Location
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Rethinking the Role of Creativity in Higher Education Contexts

How might college level instructors move away from problematic assumptions about the role of creativity in teaching and learning? Why might it be beneficial (and even necessary) to view creative expression and learning as compatible (rather than competing) instructional goals? What are the challenges, opportunities, and implications of this more compatible perspective? The purpose of this interactive talk is to explore these and related questions. Emerging examples, provocations, and considerations will be offered in an effort to induce dialogue, productive debate, and new directions for college level teaching and learning.

 

Presented by:
Ron Beghetto

205 Cornell
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Backwards Design: Mapping Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning to Information Literacy

This presentation will focus on integrating Fink’s (2013) affective elements of learning into an ISLT 1111, Information Use and Student Success. Course objectives have been revised in accordance with the new Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Framework. Revising the course gave us the opportunity to align learning activities with Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning, focusing on skills for life-long learning, connecting ideas, value learning, learning about themselves and others, and learning how to learn. We will present our own study while discussion how the Taxonomy can be applied across other disciplines in order to emphasize significant learning in foundational courses.

 

Presented by:
Jenny Bossaller, Devon Whetstone

206 Cornell
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Ghosted in the Classroom: The ins and outs of the accommodation of flexibility regarding attendance

When a student presents you with an Accommodation Notification Letter from the Disability Center that includes the accommodation of flexibility regarding attendance, what do you do? How can you ensure that you can appropriately accommodate the student while also ensuring that your course requirements and expectations are met? What happens when this request happens mid-way through the semester? What criteria should you/can you use to evaluate each student’s request? This interactive session will explain the process involved when the accommodation is approved for a student, provide case studies to facilitate exploration of options and best practices (key points: consistency and communication), and offer ideas for how to prepare for this request when it is presented (and it will be) in the future.

 

Presented by:
Angela Branson, Becca Terry, Cheryl Jobe, Elizabeth Walker

211 Cornell
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

The Role of Technology, Purpose, and Creativity in Assessment

In this interactive session, we will share strategies for formative and summative assessment. Participants will engage in a series of activities that allow them to experience the practices that will inform their teaching. Topics of discussion will include the incorporation of technology into assessment for immediate feedback, and student-driven authentic assessments. A folder of resources will be shared.

 

Presented by:
Zandra De Araujo, Laurie Kingsley

217 Cornell
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

What Is and Is Not True About “Brain-Based” Learning

Faculty can’t afford to waste valuable learning time engaging in practices based on old ideas about learning. Find out what is really true! See for yourself how the brain actually learns and the essential difference between thinking and real learning. Discover the most important factor in learning. Find out which part of the brain is still developing and how you can help students create a better brain for better learning and better life. Leave with credible strategies based on current neuroscience. Come prepared to laugh, engage, and participate in experiential activities.

 

Presented by:
Janet Zadina

218 Cornell
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Faculty Learning Communities Support Innovative Classroom Teaching

Faculty Learning Communities are formal groups of up to 12 interdisciplinary faculty engaged in a year-long process to learn about approaches for improving teaching by participating regularly in informational gatherings. FLC members commit to planning and implementing specific improvements in their own courses and are supported by the community as they undertake these projects. Two STEM- focused FLCs are currently active at Mizzou, with additional FLCs planned for next year. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of FLCs: the underlying philosophy, how they work, steps for establishing an FLC, etc., and provide examples of projects our FLC members have undertaken.

 

Presented by:
Sarah Bush, Brenda Peculis, Johannes Schul

219 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Small Teaching

No time to read? Get the inside scoop on “small teaching” by James M. Lang. Learn how making small, scientific proven changes to your teaching can make the biggest impact. You will get practical strategies that can be put to use immediately, without having to redesign your entire course. A panel of Mizzou instructors read this book and would love to share what they learned with you.

 

Presented by:
Steve Klien, Sue Boren, Beth Whitaker

205 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Pitch the Paper, Ponder the Possibilities

Are you interested in exams that include image, audio and video question options, offer exam integrity protection, provide immediate feedback for students and faculty, and have a low carbon footprint with no paper or time at the copy machine? Come with us on our journey to create exams in Canvas that maximize classroom testing capabilities with a variety of question format options while making it difficult for students to cheat.

 

Presented by:
Sherri Ulbrich, Pam Evans-Smith

206 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Departmental Transition of Core Curriculum to Open Educational Resources (OER): The Department of Health Sciences shares our experiences

In the Fall of 2017, a team of faculty from the Department of Health Sciences worked to incorporate Open Educational Resources (OER) materials in four of their core courses. These faculty, in conjunction with the University of Missouri OER librarian, will discuss the transition in this session. We will talk about how we identified and evaluated resources, how we curated the materials to share with our colleagues, and the benefits and challenges to our students. Six faculty members, a librarian, and a representative of the University Bookstore will be available to talk about their experiences and answer questions for those interested in exploring OER.

 

Presented by:
Carolyn Orbann, Grace Atkins, Dale Sanders, Ying-Hsiu Liu, Bostwana Blackburn, Mark Kuhnert, David Ruggeri, Molly Vetter-Smith, Jenna Wintemberg

211 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

You Gotta Laugh! Using Laughter to Promote Learning

Did you know that you are more creative and a better problem solver when you are laughing? And that the positive emotions that come from laughing promote effective teamwork and collaboration? Laugh if you want, but it has been shown that laughers make better learners! In this session we will discuss the benefits of laughing, both in and out of the classroom, with laughter activities that will elevate your mood, sharpen your senses, and make you a better teacher!

 

Presented by:
Clint Darr, Liz Beal

212 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Academy Integrity: Encouraging Honesty and Preventing Violations

The Director of the Office of Academic Integrity within the Provost’s Office will present on the basic knowledge faculty should have regarding academic integrity in the classroom. Topics include encouraging honesty (including promoting the Mizzou Honor Pledge), preventing dishonesty, and issues that arise when reporting violations (including those related to sanctions). In addition, MU’s Faculty Athletics Representative to the SEC and NCAA will address efforts to preserve academic integrity within collegiate athletics.

 

Presented by:
Paul Litton, Pamela Hinton

217 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

What is divergent thinking? Why should we be teaching it?

The greatest creative and innovative thinkers in history were all divergent thinkers. Why don’t we teach divergent thinking? Too hard to grade? Fear of the unknown? As graduates, students are expected to problem-solve and address ill-defined problems which require divergent thinking. In this session, you will explore ways to teach divergent thinking in your class.

 

Presented by:
Ferris Pfeiffer, Suzanne Burgoyne, Heather Hunt

218 Cornell
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Alternative Assessment Approaches to be More Inclusive and Inspiring

We will examine approaches to grading scales that prevent students from making up a poor score on one activity (attendance, exam scores, homework, paper) by doing outstanding on another activity. One approach is to multiply rather than add points. Another approach is to have each student starts the semester with an A; this approach particularly helps those with imposter syndrome and so can be more inclusive. We will have an open discussion of the merits and pitfalls of these and other approaches.

 

Presented by:
Mark Milanick

219 Cornell

 

Closing Presentation May 16, 2018
Time Event Location
1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is the Key!

Saundra McGuire

21st Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills, approaches to learning, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but are not willing to invest much time or effort in learning.

 

Presented by:
Saundra McGuire

Bush Auditorium, Cornell Hall